Review 2022 +

REVIEW 2022 +

422 Brunswick St
Fitzroy Naarm Melbourne 3065
+
1 Sutton Place
Carlton Naarm Melbourne 3053

As a way to celebrate our 20th consecutive Year of presenting high calibre exhibitions in Australia & Abroad Jacob Hoerner Galleries will Open a 2nd Space from 24.11-24.12 in addition to our Primary Space at 1 Sutton Place Carlton until the end of 2022.

Sutton Place Carlton will continue into 2023 while our Brunswick St space will only be fleeting so make the time to visit our short term entity in the Heart of Fitzroy.

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REVIEW 2022 +

Artists inc.
Rebecca Agnew
Alex Hamilton
Sean Hogan
Petra Kleinherne
Brigita Lastauskaitė
David Palliser
Andrew Sibley
+ Mary Koniavitis

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422 Brunswick St
Fitzroy

Open
12-7 Wed-Sun
& by Appt

November 24 – December 24 2022

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1 Sutton Place
Carlton

Open
12-5 Wed-Sat
& by Appt

November 17 – December 17 2022

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Celebrating
20 Years of Kick Gallery + Jacob Hoerner Galleries – 2002-2015 / 2016-2022

Celebrating
50 Years of Peaches + John Hoerner Galleries
Est. 1972

Transformations


SBS Deutsche
Radio Interview
Petra Kleinherne 

Transformations (2022)

To hear an Interview with Kleinherne on SBS Deutsche pls click here

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Artist Statement

Transformations – in German Wandlungen – points to a shift from the landscape towards the figure or a man made structure. When I work in my studio I work through memories, thoughts and experiences that come into my mind. Art history as well as contemporary art play a big role. Instead of sketching ideas on paper before painting I am putting the cart before the horse by starting freely. It is a time consuming process. What excites me is what can happen and that’s something that one cannot predict or practice in a sketch. The moment counts and for me oil paint, brush and canvas can do things that I cannot plan. I don’t like predictability or exact outcomes. It’s more risk if I do it directly and that’s what I like in painting – that risk taking, the uncertainty. It’s more spontaneous – not always successful – and it can be a struggle as nothing is planned. The ideas, memories and experiences take place and take shape on the canvas while I’m painting. And in the end one needs to pull everything together to make it work. I do not use reference material, but influences are painters like van Gogh, de Kooning, Klimt, and German Expressionism, and contemporaries such as Emil Schoenebeck, Georg Baselitz, Markus Luepertz, Cecily Brown and Adrian Ghenie.”

Petra Kleinherne
October 2022

Perspectives

Sean Hogan
PERSPECTIVES

Official Opening 6-8pm Thursday September 22 2022
September 22 – October 15 2022

Algorithms are the code that gives a computer the specific instructions to complete a task. With the first computer algorithm, inputs were made by humans and the output was the desired result. From social media to computer games, algorithms are the foundation for digital technology. As technology keeps advancing and everything keeps going digital, we’ve reached a point where algorithms are everywhere and are controlling everything. They are shaping our culture, what we see, what we hear and also how we live. The algorithms are now shaping us.

Despite their apparent benefits, algorithms are not perfect and are prone to fostering discrimination, bias and misinformation. Moreover, delegating decisions to algorithms is dangerous. Not only can algorithms create problems, but they can also perpetuate conspiracy theories and fake news. Within the social media sphere, by analyzing current and historical data, predictive algorithms forecast a users wants and needs with targeted ‘suggestions’ thus creating an echo chamber (an environment where a person only encounters information or opinions that reflect and reinforce their own).

Previously, I looked at algorithmic and system thinking and applied it to the creation of the works. In ‘Perspectives’ the works are created as a response and critique to the predictive algorithm, the echo chamber, the set of rules that promote sameness rather than diversity of thought.

Sean Hogan| September 2022


Perspectives
runs September 22 – October 15 2022

For further information / inquires

info@jacobhoernergalleries.com
+ 61 (0) 412 243 818

Endless Conditions

David Palliser
ENDLESS CONDITIONS

Official Opening 6-8pm Thursday August 25 2022
August 25 – September 17 2022



Catalogue Essay

My Mind is Made up

On a visit to David Palliser’s studio, I took a photo of a list he’d made of possible titles for artworks and exhibitions, scrawled in a notebook. His handwriting is a slightly gawky combination of cursive and print, gestural and sculptural at the same time. He says he has always written these lists and that doing so is one of the processes that contribute to making his work. “Multi Moment Moving Means Most Must Musk.” Letters change ever so slightly and make new meanings. “Suppose crossed criss crisscross.” The elements in his paintings also overlap, resist hierarchies, turn on their head and change form. “Missing shoes Track training Steering wheel.” The pathos, poetry and propulsion of painting.

Endless Conditions was the title of one of David’s old paintings. I forgot to ask him if it sold and therefore stayed complete, or if it returned to the studio where he reworked it into a different version of itself – paintings given back to artists often have second lives. Now recycled as the title of this exhibition, Endless Conditions speaks of an ongoing process of decision-making displayed in a series of small, dynamic and characteristically complex paintings. I asked, “Do you make bodies of work? It seems like all these pictures come from the same place.” By all these pictures I mean all the works in the studio, not just those for his new show. I refer to large, medium and small canvases that jut out of huge painting racks with repeated zigzagging forms and conveyer belt momentums that push geometric oddities up and off the edge of the plane, like the vertebrae of Brancusi’s infinity columns. Squiggles and architectures and compositional corkscrews. “Yes, they come from the same place,” he said.

Colours are also rehashed and role played in different relationships. There are expressive German-looking ones, earthy tones and hints of sci-fi. There are eccentric combinations that someone prudish once declared should not be seen together; orange, green, lilac; lots of yellow; and indescribable browns that make the higher keys pop and bounce about. “Figuring out the colours,” he said, “is the hardest part.”

When David presents a pile of black-and-white drawings, some collaged, I see how it all begins. Stripped of colour, these drawings contain handfuls of odd alien forms dotted about in seas of negative space. These strange figurations don’t seem to be any particular thing or being. Instead, they are the artist’s gestural micro-inventions – lyrical, with sharp teeth – that remind me of the biomorphic geometries in Miro’s pictorial worlds. These drawings are stark and strong and strange, completely successful as they are. But the paintings – with their living errors, wild colour relationships, tightness, looseness and repetitions – flesh out the spaces between those original forms, folding them in on each other and out again until some kind of magic-logic happens.

Looking back, I remember standing with an artist friend in front of one of David’s large works at an opening a few years ago, both of us thrilled with how he dared to leave in the most bizarre painterly moments. And while there were these windows of loose and manic gestures, other sections were laboured over, tended to, articulated through gradients, impasto paint and wound-up string forms. Building this tension is how David sculpturally constructs his spaces – what falls apart is drawn back together through another colour, a repeated form, a different process or a tiny section of washy paint left from the first day he started making the piece. Everything flexes between any number of dualisms: violence and jubilance, micro and macro, punk and jazz, tightness and looseness, the beginning and what’s to come.

I now see that the awe I have felt when looking at David’s paintings is a reverence for his ability to improvise. Those who know David know he plays music, and that he plays with music too. He uses it like a material. Improvisational music requires the composer to have a spontaneous and bodily connection to sound, and I wonder if that means it can easily take over other senses and become visual. He says, “Sounds jump out at you and then recede.” I think about how he weaves audible textures together in different ways to make joyful and calamitous music, similar to the way he manipulates the formal elements in his paintings. As he describes, painting becomes a kind of module to be broken – the rectangle, a sturdy container for impulsivity.

David’s paintings perform and come from endless conditions. The tensions he builds have been developed from years of turning up to the studio to see what shapes, colours, gestures and materials do in their myriad combinations. His work reminds me how painting can give so generously if it can only think highly enough of its own strangeness and imperfections, learning to work with and not against itself. I look back to the photo of David’s handwritten list. One line says, “My mind is made up.” A final and ironic gesture amid endless conditions.

Laura Skerlj | August 2022

 

Endless Conditions runs August 25 – September 17 2022

For further information / inquires

info@jacobhoernergalleries.com
+ 61 (0) 412 243 818

From the Archive

John Lennox
FROM THE ARCHIVE

Official Opening 6-8pm Thursday July 28 2022
July 28 – August 20 2022

ARTIST PROFILE

John Lennox was a central figure in a circle of artists, collectors and socialites that existed concurrently alongside the academic art establishment of Melbourne during the 1970’s and 1980’s. As is evident to any observer of his sophisticated and highly considered work Lennox was a formally trained painter, he studied under the tutelage of George Bell in the early part of his career and became an Artist who created serene imagery as well as works with extraordinary psychological complexity when he deferred from painting idyllic garden or bush scenes. Enigmatic, alluring and charismatic, Lennox sought to show beauty as well as delve deep into the psyche of a world more akin to a surreal dream.

Lennox was a finalist in the Wynne Prize (1974) and won the Camberwell Rotary Prize (1974) in that same year, in 2008 Lennox had a touring retrospective at Benalla Art Gallery (2008) & Castlemaine Art Museum (2008), he is represented in the Queensland Art Gallery, Benalla Art Gallery, St Vincent’s Hospital and in numerous private and corporate collections in Australia and Europe.

Lennox first exhibited with John & Maureen Hoerner at ‘Peaches’ gallery in 1972 and then in the early 1980s exhibited with John Hoerner & Alison Waters as a part of the John Hoerner Galleries stable. During his lifetime Lennox exhibited consistently from 1972 for 24 years until his passing in 1996. Since 2014 Lennox has had four solo exhibitions with Kick Gallery / Jacob Hoerner Galleries, From the Archive (2022), Manifold (2018), Key works (2016) and Enigma (2014), participated in numerous group exhibitions and was a part of Spring 1883 in 2021 & 2018.

From the Archive marks 50 Years since Lennox first exhibited with Peaches / John Hoerner Galleries and then Kick Gallery / Jacob Hoerner Galleries representing a 50 year period in which there has been a collaboration between the Hoerner & Lennox Families, a major half century milestone to be properly marked at the 20th & 50 Year Milestone celebrations on the 28th of July 2022.

From the Archive runs July 28 – August 20 2022

For further information / inquires

info@jacobhoernergalleries.com
+ 61 (0) 412 243 818

The Lost Ark

Rius Carson
THE LOST ARK

Official Opening 6-8pm Thursday July 28 2022
July 28 – August 20 2022

ARTIST PROFILE

Absorbed in the creative process at his studio and residence in Eppalock, Bendigo, painter and sculpture Rius Carson creates works that reflect on his experience of life and at the same time give voice to his concerns about contemporary issues. Deftly working across two mediums, the prevailing themes contained in Carson’s two and three-dimensional works refer to issues relating to environmental degradation, the implications of our current modes of behaviour on our collective future as well as a broader overarching themes relating to Buddhism, Hindu philosophies, spirituality and the omnipresence of nature.

Carson was one of the first Artists exhibited by Jacob Hoerner at Kick Gallery in it’s inaugural year in 2002, since that time Carson has had continuous exhibitions and representation by Kick Gallery / Jacob Hoerner Galleries with The Lost Ark Carson’s 12th Solo exhibition over that 20 year period.

The Lost Ark runs July 28 – August 20 2022

For further information / inquires

info@jacobhoernergalleries.com
+ 61 (0) 412 243 818

Water Stories

Brigita Lastauskaite
WATER STORIES

Official Opening 6-8pm Thursday May 26 2022
May 25 – June 18 2022

Brigita Lastauskaite completed a MFA Majoring in Textile at the Vilnius Art Academy in Kaunas (1996) and then having migrated to Australia in the late 1990s went on to study a Bachelor of Media Arts at RMIT (2001). Continually looking at new ways to further develop her visual language, explore new ways of mark making, and subtly communicate through her compositions, the influence of working with textile and texture from her tuition in Lithuania in the 1990s is still evident in her painting practice today.

Weaving the flotsam and jetsam of her scribbles, splashes and spontaneous application of paint Lastauskaite’s multi-layered works are akin to folkloric tapestries. Through an intuitive process of making marks and placing shapes Lastauskaite achieves an alluring balance in her compositions and while the placement of the visual information is often asymmetrical and without pattern, her selection of colours and materials she plays with juxtapose or interlace leading to sumptuous works that immediately engage the eye.

Water Stories is Lastauskaite’s 9th Solo Exhibition, of those 7 have been in Melbourne with the other 2 in Finland and Lithuania.  Lastauskaite has also participated in over 20 group exhibitions in Australia and Abroad.

Water Stories runs May 25 – June 18 2022

For further information / inquires

info@jacobhoernergalleries.com
+ 61 (0) 412 243 818

Selected Artists

SELECTED ARTISTS
Official Opening 6-8pm Thursday May 5 2022


REBECCA AGNEW
ALISON BINKS
HANNAH GOLDSTEIN
PETRA KLEINHERNE
BRIGITA LASTAUSKAITE
MONIQUE MORTER
KATYA PETETSKAYA
EMMA STUART
GILLIAN WARDEN

May 4 – May 21 2022

For further information / inquires

info@jacobhoernergalleries.com
+ 61 (0) 412 243 818

Paintings

Andrew Sibley
PAINTINGS

Official Opening 6-8pm Thursday March 24 2022
March 23 – April 23 2022

Born in 1933 in Kent, England, Andrew Sibley migrated to outback Queensland with his family in 1948. After leaving the family property he spent a short time stationed in Papua New Guinea before returning to Brisbane in the late 1950’s.

In the early 1960’s Sibley was a part of the ‘Brisbane School’ with Jon Molvig, Roy Churcher and, further away on Bribie Island, Ian Fairweather. Sibley found early success winning prestigious prizes and was invited to exhibit at the Whitechapel Galley in London in 1962 and the Paris Biennale in 1963. In the mid 1960’s Sibley moved to Sydney and was a part of the Rudy Komon stable that included many of the most important Australian artists of the time and where he established life long connections. After moving to Melbourne in the late 1960’s Sibley was appointed a teaching position at RMIT (1968 – 1988) being influenced and inspired by many of his fellow lecturers who were also recognised for their work during this period such as Jan Senberg, Les Kosatz & George Baldessin as well as imparting his knowledge and particular understanding of making Art on generations of Melbourne based artists at that time.

Paintings is an exhibition of Oil & Enamel Paintings on board & also on linen from the 1960s ranging from 1964-1969. A small survey of an important decade when Sibley commenced his critically and commercially successful career that lasted over 50 years until his passing in 2015.

Paintings runs March 23 – April 16 2022

For further information / inquires

info@jacobhoernergalleries.com
+ 61 (0) 412 243 818

The Land will not run down to the Sea

Alex Hamilton
The Land will not run down to the Sea

Official Opening 6-8pm Thursday March 3 2022
March 2 – 19 2022

“An illustration of an unrealised Apple outlet in Federation Square Melbourne, a one word poem rearranging the letters of the word “monoxide”, and a music score by the artist rendered into cut out holes for pianola player piano, underpins free drawing between fragmented horizon lines. ”

– Alex Hamilton 2022