SPRING 1883 PREVIEW

Spring 1883 Preview

REBECCA AGNEW
ANDREW GRITSCHER
SEAN HOGAN
ALEX HAMILTON
PETRA KLEINHERNE
ANDREW SIBLEY

Afternoon Opening
4-6pm Saturday July 15 2023

July 13 – 29 2023

Jacob Hoerner Galleries
I Sutton Place Carlton
Naarm 3053

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Concurrent to Jacob Hoerner Galleries + Radar on 15/06/23 to be held at

Radar
Mid-Century Showroom
430 George St Fitzroy
Naarm 3065

Sponsored by the Melbourne Gin Company
www.melbournegincompany.com

JACOB HOERNER GALLERIES + RADAR

A collaborative presentation of Art & Design

JACOB HOERNER GALLERIES
+ RADAR

Paintings on Linen & Ink on Ceramic Tiles
ANDREW GRITSCHER

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Furniture & Lighting Design Labels from Radar

FINN JUHL
HANS WEGNER
BORGE MOGENSEN
ILLUM WIKKELSO
ARNE VODDER
ICO PARISI
PAOLO BUFFA
MAX INGRAND

Special Opening Event
at 2 Premiere Inner City Locations

Afternoon Opening
4-6pm Saturday July 15 2023

Jacob Horner Galleries
I Sutton Place Carlton
Naarm 3053

+

Radar
Mid-Century Showroom
430 George St Fitzroy
Naarm 3065

Sponsored by the Melbourne Gin Company
www.melbournegincompany.com

 

UNBECOMING

UNBECOMING

Georgia Biggs
Dord Burrough
Beatrice Dahllof
Alex Hamilton
Moya McKenna
David Palliser
Julia Powles
Gareth Sansom
& Peter Westwood

Unbecoming is a group exhibition of work from nine artists at different stages of their careers whose painting practices embrace a process of change, duration and imagination. For a painting to form into something, to coalesce materially and conceptually, to shape itself to its final destination, it must necessarily go through a series of transformations. These transformations of state, where paint acts as the slippage from thought into action, from one type of material manifestation to another, characterise painting as fundamentally unpredictable. Un-making and making are equally valued – the painting through the nature of its process ‘unbecomes’ in order to become something new. It is in this period of to-ing and fro-ing, of one thing becoming another, then on to another, that new and different ideas emerge. And in bringing forth the new, paint has the capacity to parallel imagination, free to summon impossible realities, combine disparate imageries and hold close incompatible forces.

David Palliser & Julia Powles
Co-Curators + Participating Artists
May 2023

Georgia Biggs, Julia Powles & Peter Westwood are Represented by Block Projects | Alex Hamilton is Represented by Jacob Hoerner Galleries & Patrick Heide (London) | David Palliser is Represented by Jacob Hoerner Galleries | Moya McKenna is Represented by Neon Parc | Gareth Sansom is Represented by Station Gallery | Dord Burrough is Represented by Lon | Beatrice Dahllof is Represented by Huxley-Parlour (London).

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CATALOGUE ESSAY

UNBECOMING 

The title of this exhibition might be a good place to start. Used as a pejorative the term unbecoming outlines certain actions or objects as unsuitable; subjectively deemed inappropriate for the context in which they operate. Questions of taste come into play, we wonder if the gesture, action or artefact fits in? Is it ok? Can it be tolerated? The idea that contemporary art might be seen as unbecoming – indecorous, off-putting or ugly – is not new, it is a narrative that runs in tandem to art making from the mid nineteenth century onwards. By placing a naked woman at the centre of what would have otherwise been a quaint scene of friends enjoying a picnic lunch, Édouard Manet broke with the conventional rules of the times and challenged what could be depicted. Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe created a rupture in not only painterly technique and choice of imagery, but also in the thinking of audiences. The figures appear discordant, jarring in their relationship to each other – the clothed men chat nonchalantly to each other while the naked woman stares out of the canvas at us –– what were they doing, what had they been doing in this rural idyll?

The appropriateness of responding tastefully to a modern world capable of unimaginable atrocities was legitimately challenged by twentieth century artists to such an extent that this question now sits outside any meaningful conversation on contemporary art. Yet to be unbecoming, to be not quite right – to not really fit in – is a quality that still has the power to unnerve us. Art at its essence exists to pose questions. Sometimes this is done in a jarring, forthright or shocking manner, and other times it is more nuanced, the questions more probing of our inner selves and our unthinking certainties. By making us examine what we see before us, art asks us to reconsider our accepted understanding of the way things are – and it is here, in the space of finding a new way of thinking, that the second meaning of unbecoming comes to the forefront.

For a painting to form into something, to coalesce materially and conceptually, to shape itself to its final iteration, it must necessarily go through a series of changes. These changes of state, where paint becomes the slippage from thought into action, from one type of material manifestation to another, characterise painting as fundamentally mutable. At any point in the process of arriving at the finished work, a painting might have reached its completion; when we look at a painting, we can often see that embedded within it are its previous manifestations. Sometimes we can see the decision making of the artist, while at other times we know from the thickness of the paint, the wipes and smears, or via an awareness of the layering of colour upon colour, or the reveal that happens through the scraping of a surface, that earlier versions and differing possibilities are embedded within the painting. We are looking at not only the painting as it is before us, here in the moment, but also the duration of its making. Such an encounter with duration – time spent – brings into focus the sense of becoming intrinsic to painting, which is, as Australian philosopher Elizabeth Grosz more accurately articulates, an engagement with unbecoming (1).

The unbecoming of one thing to become another is an inherent part of making paintings. The painter makes a mark, she forms that into something on the canvas – a shape, a face, a chair, and then after consideration she alters that thing, changing it into something else. The paint and the brush and the mind integrate to form a sequence of becomings, of solidifications; manifestations of ideas that come into being through first unbecoming the thing they were.

Change requires a process of un-making as much as making. Painting through the nature of its process unbecomes to become something new. It is in this period of to-ing and fro-ing, of one thing becoming another, and on to be yet another that new and different awareness’s appear. And in bringing forth the new, paint has the ability to parallel imagination, free to summon impossible realities, combine disparate imageries and hold close incompatible forces.

It is painting’s inextricable engagement with duration that underscores this experience for the viewer. Duration – the space between actions – is the place, according to French philosopher Henri Bergson, that the new can be developed (2). Something happens, something unknown takes form and shape in the elliptical qualities of duration, where thought loops back on itself and undoes at the same time as it creates. In developing the concept of duration Bergson sought to understand the way that time can be perceived within us, as non-linear. Clock-time, to use Bergson’s term is mechanical, measurable, and unalterable, whereas for an individual, time is both fast and slow, time is partial, incomplete. We return to past thoughts, we pick up where we left off, we experience time concurrently and separately, our inner lives are not necessarily experienced sequentially. Painting is an encounter with both clock time and interior time. Not only does the physicality of its making reside within the final iteration of the painting (we see that this painting took time to create) but within the myriad of readings attributable we bump up against the inner world of the artist, whose themes, motifs and ideas run to a separate, internal timeframe. Memories, snippets of conversations, dreams, research, and future imaginings co-exist within an internal duration. We can summon up references from our past instantly, juxtaposing unrelated events, forming new and impossibly fanciful structures. In this manner we can find time, painting and thought analogous, where each could be conceived of as a shape, a space of action, or a heterotopia.

Thought, says American poet and art critic, Susan Stewart is like water (3). We dive into it and re-surface, it engulfs us, it carries us along, and we belong to it in a manner that is elemental; thought untethers us from the material world – in our thoughts we too are able to unbecome.

Julia Powles
Julia is an artist, curator, and writer, living and working in Naam/Melbourne. She respectfully pays tribute to the people of the Kulin Nations, and their Ancestors and Elders, past, present, and future on whose unceded lands she lives and works.

Notes:
1. Elizabeth Grosz (2005) Bergson, ‘Deleuze and the Becoming of Unbecoming’, Parallax, 11:2, 4-13. Routledge.
2. Henri Bergson, (2010) The Creative Mind: An Introduction to Metaphysics, Dover Publications
3. Susan Stewart (2005) Open Studio: Essays on Art and Aesthetics University of Chicago Press

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Jacob Hoerner Galleries
1 Sutton Place
Carlton 3053
Naarm / Melbourne

Open
12-5pm Wed- Sat
(& by Appt)

For further information / inquires

info@jacobhoernergalleries.com
+ 61 (0) 412 243 818

From Open Clouds

Monique Morter
From Open Clouds

Official Opening 6-8pm Thursday May 18 2023
May 18 – June 10 2023

Jacob Hoerner Galleries
1 Sutton Place
Carlton 3053
Naarm / Melbourne

Open
12-5pm Wed- Sat
(& by Appt)

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For further information / inquires

info@jacobhoernergalleries.com
+ 61 (0) 412 243 818

Perspex – 1973-1979


Andrew Sibley

PERSPEX – 1973-1979

Official Opening 6-8pm Thursday April 20 2023
To be Officially Opened at 6.30pm by Dr Vivien Gaston
Honorary Fellow | University of Melbourne

April 20 – May 13 2023


ARTIST PROFILE

Andrew Sibley’s works in Perspex and bas-relief demonstrate his persistent concern to investigate the process of seeing. Sibley invents a visual world ambiguously poised between painting and sculpture, a kind of drawing in three dimensions in which layers of space resonate and interact with painterly ambiguity. He exploits the tensions between the veils and layers, fogging up the visual field at the same time as flourishing a slippery quality of paint that is dragged, wiped and split across surfaces with a surreal spontaneity.

Dr Vivien Gaston
2003

Excerpt from the Exhibition Catalogue for Andrew Sibley – The Beautiful Human Zoo at the Monash University Museum of Art (2003)

Perspex – 1973-1979 runs April 20 – May 13 2023

For further information / inquires

info@jacobhoernergalleries.com
+ 61 (0) 412 243 818

Jacob Hoerner Galleries
1 Sutton Place
Carlton 3053
Naarm / Melbourne

Open
12-5pm Wed- Sat
(& by Appt)

Your Temple is a Jumping Castle lost in the Ether

Andrew Gritscher
YOUR TEMPLE IS A JUMPING CASTLE LOST IN THE ETHER

Official Opening 6-8pm Thursday March 23 2023
March 23 – April 15 2023

“All my work has over the years in one way or another been collaged, cut and pasted, made of remnants & collections. Maybe a reflection of my artistic upbringing & influences or of the over informed, over influenced age we find ourselves in. We live day to day, apart from trying to process our own thoughts & feelings, in a surf of information, influence & inspiration. The influx is overwhelming and hard to avoid. Art has come to reference itself endlessly, sometimes this is all it does. Music is full of sample heavy construction, film, writing etc. we are all collaging in one way or another from the world around us or the world that has been.

Part of the intrigue & interest of work now is to find its source material. As a clearer meaning of a work may be found in its ingredient rather than its outcome.

These pictures are collaged, smashed collided in thematics, meaning, stories, imagery then turned upside down, sideways, back to front, inside out, shaken, eroded, erased, inverted – any which way in order to try obfuscate, avoid or transform the meaning still on display. Perhaps a reflection of not wanting to again confront the ideas and thoughts collected over the past few years – which have been anything but pleasant. Or trying to find something more positive among it. Something akin to a homeopathic remedy, where the cure is found within the cause.”

Andrew Gritscher| March 2023


Your Temple is a Jumping Castle lost in the Ether
runs March 23 – April 15 2023

For further information / inquires

info@jacobhoernergalleries.com
+ 61 (0) 412 243 818

Selected Works

Open
12-5pm Saturdays & Sundays

March 4 – 19 2023

Jacob Hoerner Galleries
1 Sutton Place
Carlton 3053
Naarm / Melbourne

As a way to properly celebrate the commencement of our 21st consecutive Year of presenting exhibitions in Australia Jacob Hoerner Galleries will host an outdoor En Plein Air Exhibition at Rudder Grange Alphington of New Works by Alison Binks in addition to a concurrent survey of Selected Works by Emma Stuart.

Pls be invited to attend either or both Afternoon Openings on March 4 & March 5, following this Special set of presentations our Sutton Place Carlton will continue into 2023 with New Exhibitions throughout the year.

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EMMA STUART – ARTIST PROFILE

Emma Stuart has a deep sense of connection and love for the Australian Landscape and has chosen to make it the central subject of her painting practice. Whether it’s through the way she captures the dappled colours of first light or the end of a day, or the way she captures tonal streaks across the wayward branches of the Gums she depicts, Stuart imbues a reverential importance into the natural habitats she elevates through painting.

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Request a PDF Catalogue
info@jacobhoernergalleries.com

 

Selected Works runs March 4 – 19 2023

 

Between the Trees

En Plein Air Exhibition

Open
12-6pm Wed – Sat
* Daily Weather Conditions Permitting

As a way to properly celebrate the commencement of our 21st consecutive Year of presenting exhibitions in Australia Jacob Hoerner Galleries will host an outdoor En Plein Air Exhibition at Rudder Grange Alphington of New Works by Alison Binks in addition to a concurrent survey of Selected Works by Emma Stuart.

Pls be invited to attend either or both Afternoon Openings on March 4 & March 5, following this Special set of presentations our Sutton Place Carlton will continue into 2023 with New Exhibitions throughout the year.

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ALISON BINKS – ARTIST PROFILE

Alison Binks came seriously to painting after establishing a career in architecture and interior design. Her sparse compositions, with their delicately worked surfaces, have the designer’s touch in the surety of their composition and intuitive sense of proportion. They combine an abstract simplicity with an understanding and feeling for the landscape, which comes from close direct observation.

 

Request a PDF Catalogue
info@jacobhoernergalleries.com

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Directions

By Car
Drive to Heidelberg Road
Then continue to the River / Rudder Grange via Alphington St or Yarraford Ave

Parking
There is limited Parking on Alphington St, Yarraford Ave & The Esplanade all in close proximity to the Yarra / Rudder Grange, if possible it is recommended to take a Taxi/Uber to the Official Opening when Parking will be in demand, all other times ample Parking should be available.

By Train
Take Train to Fairfield Station
Then walk or Uber/Taxi to the River / Rudder Grange via of Alphington St or Yarraford Ave

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Between the Trees runs March 1 – 18 2023

 

Review 2022 +

REVIEW 2022 +

422 Brunswick St
Fitzroy Naarm Melbourne 3065
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1 Sutton Place
Carlton Naarm Melbourne 3053

As a way to celebrate our 20th consecutive Year of presenting high calibre exhibitions in Australia & Abroad Jacob Hoerner Galleries will Open a 2nd Space from 24.11-24.12 in addition to our Primary Space at 1 Sutton Place Carlton until the end of 2022.

Sutton Place Carlton will continue into 2023 while our Brunswick St space will only be fleeting so make the time to visit our short term entity in the Heart of Fitzroy.

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REVIEW 2022 +

Artists inc.
Rebecca Agnew
Alex Hamilton
Sean Hogan
Petra Kleinherne
Brigita Lastauskaitė
David Palliser
Andrew Sibley
+ Mary Koniavitis

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422 Brunswick St
Fitzroy

Open
12-7 Wed-Sun
& by Appt

November 24 – December 24 2022

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1 Sutton Place
Carlton

Open
12-5 Wed-Sat
& by Appt

November 17 – December 17 2022

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Celebrating
20 Years of Kick Gallery + Jacob Hoerner Galleries – 2002-2015 / 2016-2022

Celebrating
50 Years of Peaches + John Hoerner Galleries
Est. 1972

Transformations


SBS Deutsche
Radio Interview
Petra Kleinherne 

Transformations (2022)

To hear an Interview with Kleinherne on SBS Deutsche pls click here

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Artist Statement

Transformations – in German Wandlungen – points to a shift from the landscape towards the figure or a man made structure. When I work in my studio I work through memories, thoughts and experiences that come into my mind. Art history as well as contemporary art play a big role. Instead of sketching ideas on paper before painting I am putting the cart before the horse by starting freely. It is a time consuming process. What excites me is what can happen and that’s something that one cannot predict or practice in a sketch. The moment counts and for me oil paint, brush and canvas can do things that I cannot plan. I don’t like predictability or exact outcomes. It’s more risk if I do it directly and that’s what I like in painting – that risk taking, the uncertainty. It’s more spontaneous – not always successful – and it can be a struggle as nothing is planned. The ideas, memories and experiences take place and take shape on the canvas while I’m painting. And in the end one needs to pull everything together to make it work. I do not use reference material, but influences are painters like van Gogh, de Kooning, Klimt, and German Expressionism, and contemporaries such as Emil Schoenebeck, Georg Baselitz, Markus Luepertz, Cecily Brown and Adrian Ghenie.”

Petra Kleinherne
October 2022